Patterns of Treatment Modalities in Saudi Patients Treated with Dental Implants

  • Rahaf Al-Safadi Department of Preventive Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Riyadh Elm University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Riham Al-Safadi Department of Preventive Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Riyadh Elm University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Reef Al-Safadi Department of Preventive Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Riyadh Elm University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Mohammed Al-Shulayyil University Dental Hospital, College of Dentistry, Riyadh Elm University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Wallaa Al-Hemaidi University Dental Hospital, College of Dentistry, Riyadh Elm University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Yara Al-Senani University Dental Hospital, College of Dentistry, Riyadh Elm University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Sarah Faqih University Dental Hospital, College of Dentistry, Riyadh Elm University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Abdallah Junaidallah University Dental Hospital, College of Dentistry, Riyadh Elm University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Abrar Al-Shahri University Dental Hospital, College of Dentistry, Riyadh Elm University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Aim: The primary aim of this study was to detect the patterns of implant prosthetic treatment modalities among Saudi adults restored with dental implants in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The secondary objective was to describe the status of the health insurance covering dental implants in Saudi Arabia.

Materials and Methods: 323 Saudi patients aged ≥18 years residing in Saudi Arabia and treated with at least one dental implant were randomly selected and clinically examined for implant prostheses types (single-tooth, implant-supported long or short span conventional fixed bridge, implant overenture) done in dental premises (hospitals, polyclinics, private clinics, etc…) in Saudi Arabia. Radiographs were used too. The health insurance covering dental implants was detected. The data obtained including age, gender, systemic disease, and tobacco smoking were documented in a patient examination form then statistically analyzed using Chi-Square Test or Fisher-Freeman-Halton Test and U-Test.

Results: The most frequently tooth type replaced by dental implants was the molars (46.9%), followed by premolars (41.6%), incisors (6.5%), and canines (5%); mandibular first molars were the most common tooth type replaced by implants. Single-tooth implant was the most common prosthetic treatment modality (88.3%), followed by implant-supported short span conventional fixed bridge (9.3%), implant overdenture (1.6%), and implant-supported long span conventional fixed bridge (0.9%). The percentages of single-tooth implant and implant-supported short span fixed bridge were higher in patients <40 years than in patients ≥40 years; however, in all age groups, single-tooth implant was the most common prosthesis type, and short span fixed bridge was the second most common prosthesis type. Of all teeth types replaced by dental implants, molars were the most common type in long span fixed bridges (36.1%) and in single-tooth implants (50.2%), and premolars were the most common type in short span fixed bridges (43.9%); also, of all teeth types replaced by dental implants, canines were the most common type in overdentures (56.7%). Incisors were mainly replaced by single-tooth implants (52.8%). There was an insignificant difference in the median of dental implants between males and females.

Conclusion: Single-tooth implant is major. Health insurance policy doesn’t cover dental implants in Saudi Arabia. Dental implant therapy is no more a complementary or an accessory procedure.

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Published
2019-05-11
How to Cite
Al-Safadi, R., Al-Safadi, R., Al-Safadi, R., Al-Shulayyil, M., Al-Hemaidi, W., Al-Senani, Y., Faqih, S., Junaidallah, A., & Al-Shahri, A. (2019). Patterns of Treatment Modalities in Saudi Patients Treated with Dental Implants. International Journal of Emerging Trends in Science and Technology, 6(04), 6802-6810. Retrieved from http://ijetst.in/index.php/ijetst/article/view/1438
Section
Articles

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